The Sociological Review – book review and podcast

One piece of advice that I was given as a PhD student was to think about what my ‘home’ journal was – the academic journal that I feel my research fits most closely into. For me, this was – and still is – The Sociological Review, for its ambitious and activist-oriented re-thinking of sociology for the 21st century. I was thrilled, therefore, to co-run a workshop at the journal’s conference last July, with my wonderful colleague Tiffany Page from The 1752 Group/University of Cambridge. At the conference, we recorded a podcast about our work with The 1752 Group, which you can listen to here.

In addition, I have also recently reviewed Christy Kulz’s brilliant book Factories for Learning for The Sociological Review blog. Christy and I were PhD students at Goldsmiths together, both supervised by Bev Skeggs. Christy’s PhD research – and now her book – were on a flagship academy school in London, looking at how race, class and gender inequalities were reproduced within the school, and how academisation facilitated this. I was always envious of her research, both because she was doing such a politically urgent piece of research, and also because she was doing it so well. The book is a brilliant read – a masterclass in carrying out ethnography with young people – and you can read my review of it here.

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The Sociological Review – book review and podcast

Submission to UK govt consultation on sex and relationships education in schools

A few months ago I submitted a response to the UK government’s consultation on sex and relationships education in schools. For a comprehensive discussion of the consultation documents, the End Violence Against Women coalition’s response is worth reading in full. However, in reading this there was one aspect of the consultation document that rang some bells, and so, drawing on my research with Kim Allen, I submitted the following response:

Continue reading “Submission to UK govt consultation on sex and relationships education in schools”

Submission to UK govt consultation on sex and relationships education in schools

Chapter in ‘The Classical Music Industry’

I’m really pleased to have a chapter in a recently published edited volume, The Classical Music Industry, edited by Chris Dromey and Julia Haferkorn. My chapter looks at the ways in which class and gender influenced the aspirations and career pathways of young classical musicians – read the abstract here. There is a launch event happening on 16 October 2018 at Middlesex University but unfortunately due to teaching commitments I am unable to make it – such a pity as the editors have done a great job both on the conference and the book of pulling together an interesting range of perspectives from industry and academia.

If you can’t persuade your library to buy the book, then email me anna.bull@port.ac.uk and I can share a pre-publication copy.

Chapter in ‘The Classical Music Industry’

Evaluating evaluations – questioning the evidence base for El Sistema

Earlier this year Geoff Baker, Mark Taylor and I published an article for British Journal of Music Education analysing two evaluations of El Sistema or El Sistema-inspired programmes. Geoff has blogged about our article, and it is well worth reading his book about El Sistema and the rest of his blog posts if you are not familiar with his work.

As with all my publications, if you don’t have access, please email me anna.bull@port.ac.uk and I can send a copy.

Evaluating evaluations – questioning the evidence base for El Sistema

Critical perspectives on ‘character education’

Along with Kim Allen from University of Leeds, earlier this year I edited a special issue for Sociological Research Online on ‘character education’. We also wrote an article about how character education policies have migrated from the US to the UK, following the funding that has put this idea on the UK policy agenda back to its source. If you want the blog-length version, read our short piece here.

We ran a launch event for the special issue at Goldsmiths, University of London in July, and had some great speakers. Two of the responses to the special issue are now up on the Sociological Research Online blog, by Val Gillies and Akane Kanai.

Critical perspectives on ‘character education’

New report: ‘Silencing students: institutional responses to staff sexual misconduct in higher education’.

My new report for The 1752 Group has been published. We have also published a consultation document on investigations guidelines for HE institutions, drawing on evidence from the research.

You can read coverage in WonkHE and The Guardian as well.

New report: ‘Silencing students: institutional responses to staff sexual misconduct in higher education’.