Chapter in ‘The Classical Music Industry’

I’m really pleased to have a chapter in a recently published edited volume, The Classical Music Industry, edited by Chris Dromey and Julia Haferkorn. My chapter looks at the ways in which class and gender influenced the aspirations and career pathways of young classical musicians – read the abstract here. There is a launch event happening on 16 October 2018 at Middlesex University but unfortunately due to teaching commitments I am unable to make it – such a pity as the editors have done a great job both on the conference and the book of pulling together an interesting range of perspectives from industry and academia.

If you can’t persuade your library to buy the book, then email me anna.bull@port.ac.uk and I can share a pre-publication copy.

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Chapter in ‘The Classical Music Industry’

Evaluating evaluations – questioning the evidence base for El Sistema

Earlier this year Geoff Baker, Mark Taylor and I published an article for British Journal of Music Education analysing two evaluations of El Sistema or El Sistema-inspired programmes. Geoff has blogged about our article, and it is well worth reading his book about El Sistema and the rest of his blog posts if you are not familiar with his work.

As with all my publications, if you don’t have access, please email me anna.bull@port.ac.uk and I can send a copy.

Evaluating evaluations – questioning the evidence base for El Sistema

Critical perspectives on ‘character education’

Along with Kim Allen from University of Leeds, earlier this year I edited a special issue for Sociological Research Online on ‘character education’. We also wrote an article about how character education policies have migrated from the US to the UK, following the funding that has put this idea on the UK policy agenda back to its source. If you want the blog-length version, read our short piece here.

We ran a launch event for the special issue at Goldsmiths, University of London in July, and had some great speakers. Two of the responses to the special issue are now up on the Sociological Research Online blog, by Val Gillies and Akane Kanai.

Critical perspectives on ‘character education’

New report: ‘Silencing students: institutional responses to staff sexual misconduct in higher education’.

My new report for The 1752 Group has been published. We have also published a consultation document on investigations guidelines for HE institutions, drawing on evidence from the research.

You can read coverage in WonkHE and The Guardian as well.

New report: ‘Silencing students: institutional responses to staff sexual misconduct in higher education’.

‘Women conductors are not my cup of tea’. Classical music’s gender inequality problem

Conductor Mariss Jansons today receives the prestigious Royal Philharmonic Society (RPS) Gold Medal at London’s Barbican Centre. The Latvian conductor will become the 104th recipient of the medal. Jansons is currently chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and conductor emeritus of the Royal Concertgebouw in Amsterdam.

Classical Music magazine describes how, in an interview for The Telegraph, Ivan Hewett asked Jansons how he felt about ‘the biggest change in the conducting scene’ – the increase in female conductors over Jansons’s career.

“Hmm, well. Well I don’t want to give offence,” said Jansons, “and I am not against it, that would be very wrong. I understand the world has changed, and there is now no profession that can be confined to this or that gender. It’s a question of what one is used to. I grew up in a different world, and for me seeing a woman on the podium… well, let’s just say it’s not my cup of tea.”

Is it a problem that someone with such attitudes is receiving one of classical music’s most prestigious awards? And what does this say about the classical music world? Continue reading “‘Women conductors are not my cup of tea’. Classical music’s gender inequality problem”

‘Women conductors are not my cup of tea’. Classical music’s gender inequality problem

Miscellany

Here’s a round-up of my online activity over the past month or two.

Dr Kim Allen, from University of Leeds, and I are editing a special issue of the journal Sociological Research Online about ‘character education’ in the UK, following our successful one-day conference on this topic last year. We are also writing an article for this special issue on education policy networks, looking at how money and ideas from the US are flowing into the UK education system. One of the people involved in these policy networks is Sir Anthony Seldon, so Kim and I were very interested to read the report on ‘The Positive University’ that he co-authored last month. We wrote a blog post in response to this for WonkHE, which received a lot of attention on social media. Our article on character education policy networks will be out next spring.

At The 1752 Group, we’ve been very busy working on staff sexual misconduct in higher education, and I was interviewed about the unfolding sexual harassment scandals in Westminster, Hollywood and higher education for Turkish news channel TRT.

Finally, on a lighter note, my interview on class and classical music for the University of Melbourne’s sociology radio programme, Socbites, is on their October podcast, but listen to the rest of the podcast as well for discussions of how sociologists research class and music more widely.

Miscellany